Untitled Document
For Consumers


Q1. What are the changes in the cable colour code for fixed wiring?

Q2. Why are the changes for cable colour code necessary?

Q3. Do I need to re-wire all existing wiring to the new cable colour code for my house?

Q4. Does the new cable colour change apply to power cables of electrical appliances?

Q5. When can I use the new cable colour code for fixed wiring?

Q6. Who should I engage if I want to re-wire my house?

 

 

 

 


Q1. What are the changes in the cable colour code for fixed wiring?

The new colours for three-phase conductors are brown, black and grey. The new colour for neutral conductor is blue. The green-and-yellow identification for protective conductor remains unchanged.

For single phase installation, the new colour for live conductor and neutral conductor is brown and blue respectively. The green-and-yellow identification for protective conductor remains unchanged. The new colour code aligns with the flexible cords used for appliances.



Q2. Why are the changes for cable colour code necessary?

The new cable colour code was adopted by the European Committee for Electrotechnical Standardization (CENELEC) for electrical installations of its member countries. United Kingdom, one of the members of CENELEC, had subsequently revised the IEE Wiring Regulations and adopted the harmonized cable colour code in 2004 to align with the European practices. Hong Kong has also recently aligned their cable colour code with the UK practices

As more and more countries adopt the new cable colour code, there is no advantage for a small country like Singapore with much lower demand of electrical cables than many other countries to keep the existing cable colour code that is different from that of the international community.

Furthermore, with the decreasing demand in electrical cables under the existing colour code around the world, the cost of electric cables under the existing colour code may become less competitive and the delivery may become more unreliable in the future.

As such, it would make economic sense for Singapore to adopt the new cable colour code.



Q3. Do I need to re-wire all existing wiring to the new cable colour code for my house?

You need not make any changes to the existing wiring of your electrical installation. In the event that alterations or additions to your existing installation are needed, you should engage Licensed Electrical Workers, to ensure that these are carried out properly.



Q4. Does the new cable colour change apply to power cables of electrical appliances?

No, the change in cable colour code does not apply to flexible power cords for electrical appliances. No change of power cord for any electrical appliance is required.



Q5. When can I use the new cable colour code for fixed wiring?

You may use the new colour code for fixed wiring with effect from 1 Mar 2009.
To minimize disruption to existing projects and for the industry to adapt to the change in cable colour code, there will be a transition period of 24 months (i.e. from 1 Mar 2009 to 28 Feb 2011) before the new cable colour code is made mandatory.
After the transition period, that is from 1 Mar 2011 onwards, all new installations, replacement or extensions will have to comply with the new cable colour code.



Q6. Who should I engage if I want to rewire my house?

Consumers shall engage licensed electrical workers to install or supervise the installation of electrical wiring (including new electrical wiring, or addition or alteration to existing electrical wiring) in their premises. The list of licensed electrical workers can be obtained from EMA web site at: Search for Licensed Electrical Workers



 
For People in The Trade


Q1. Can I continue to use the old cable colour code if my project period ends after the transition period?

Q2. Do the service cables of SP PowerGrid Ltd need to comply with the new cable colour code?

Q3. Do high voltage cables need to mark according to the new cable colour code?

Q4. Is there any course available for me to attend to understand the change in cable colour code?

 

 

 

Q1. Can I continue to use the old cable colour code if my project period ends after the transition period?

It is not recommended to have 2 versions of cable colour code within an electrical installation. As such, you are advised to start using the new cable colour code for new projects after 1 Mar 2009.

However, if your contract was awarded before 1 Mar 2009, you may use the old cable colour code for the particular project.



Q2. Do the service cables of SP PowerGrid Ltd need to comply with the new cable colour code?

Although the new cable colour code does not apply to the transmission and distribution network of SP PowerGrid Ltd, to avoid confusion, SP PowerGrid Ltd will provide colour marking and warning notice at the intake point of each electrical installation where new service cables are connected.



Q3. Do high voltage cables need to mark according to the new cable colour code?

Yes. To avoid confusion, the new colour markings, i.e. L1, L2 and L3 shall be provided at the switchgear or cable compartment where new cables are terminated to differentiate the three line cables.



Q4. Is there any course available for me to attend to understand the change in cable colour code?

Yes. You may register for the short courses organized by BCA Academy or Institute of Technical Education.

Please visit EMA's website on New Cable Colour Code for Electrical Installations for more information on the course offered by the training institutions.


 
Copyright 2009